The Music Cues of Heirs

Since February is Lee Min Ho month, I thought I’d talk about Heirs, but not about the actors, the story, the romance. I want to talk about the music.

Remember on the Introductions post how I said watching too K-Dramas turned my brain to mush. That happened. I overdosed on K-Dramas and decided to quit cold turkey. So for maybe a year, I abstained. I set my eyes on American television, like Gossip Girl and Mad Men and Breaking Bad. Because I wanted darkness, I wanted to watch the depravity that’s nested deep within all of humankind.

But then after a while, I heard murmurings of this new drama called HEIRS

So I decided to venture back into the sunshine, and I was SO happy I did.

There are certain dramas that have amazing OSTs. Most recent ones include GOBLIN and MIRROR OF THE WITCH. But nothing–absolutely nothing–can topple HEIRS from the top of the list.

Because that soundtrack is perfect.

And this is how I can tell…every time I hear even the first couple notes of any of the songs from HEIRS, my heart expands in my chest, and I let out a very uncontrollable squealing sound. Every single one of the musical cues and songs from HEIRS makes me instantly remember how amazing the romance was, how debilitating the heartbreak was, and how awesome the struggle is to be loved by two tall, insanely handsome Korean men.

So, let me break down the best of the best from the HEIRS OST.

 

1. The Dreamcatcher Theme

This song is my all-time favorite. Every time I hear it, I immediately want Park Shin Hye to jump into Lee Min Ho’s arms, maybe do a twirl. Because they so, so love each other.

 

 

2. That Lee Hong Ki Song

I just recently found out that Lee Hong Ki sang this song, and now that I know, it all makes sense. The high notes, the timbre of his voice. Why didn’t I piece it together sooner? “I’m Saying” performed by Lee Hong Ki was a song that they used a lot to lead up to the classic ending freeze-frame shots.

I also think HEIRS does a fantastic job in overdoing the dissolve transitions between shots. I mean there’s no way that every single shot of Park Shin Hye looking at Lee Min Ho can be that amazing? But they were!  I gobbled it up. All the wides of her looking at him. The close-ups. Even the shots of him or her from behind gazing as the other walked off into the distance.  I could watch a full hour or them just looking at each other with no dialogue.

 

 

One of the reasons this song works so perfectly for endings is because the melody is light and poppy. For instance, when Choi Young Do barges into Kim Tan’s house and finds out Cha Eun Sung is also living in the same house was such a cataclysmic cliffhanger. Because Choi Young Do is dangerous. Yes, he loves Cha Eun Sung, but he still is capable of doing crazy, mean things. He’s downright scary sometimes.  But cut with the light, high energy melody of the song, it changes everything. It’s less dangerous. More fun. And it leaves viewers with raised eyebrows and delightfully dropped jaws instead of the feeling of wanting to throw the TV out the window.

 

 

3. This Cool Breeze Song

2Young’s “Serendipity” is one of those songs that makes you feel at ease. You think, “life is great.” You’re in a car, with a hot guy, and the wind is blowing through your amazing hair. Life is truly great.

 

4. The Song that Comes on when Someone is Fighting or Glaring

How can this song be so bad while also being so good? I think that’s some of the beauty of all the music cues of HEIRS, but this one moreso than the rest. The crunchy guitars, the heavy metal riff at the end…it’s full of machismo. It fits perfectly whenever Choi Young Do (Park Won Bin) and Kim Tan (Lee Min Ho) are ready to puff their chests out for a fight.

Also take note how masterfully they transition to Lee Hong Ki’s song at the very end.

 

5. Choi Young Do’s Heartbreak Theme

If this song never came on during scenes between Choi Young Do and Cha Eun Sung, I would absolute hate this guy. I would abhor him. I would detest him. I would want him to rot at the bottom of a dumpster. Because without this music, he’s just a very tall, immature bully with insanely expressive eyebrows. But thanks to Cold Cherry‘s “Growing Pains 2,” I now know that he’s more than that. He’s sensitive, protective of those he loves, passionate. And he has a very mushy, although heavily guarded heart.

 

6. Love is Feeling / Love is my PAIN!

This song is called “Love is…” Which makes sense, because love is so many things. It’s full of feeling, full of pain. Love is so many things that they needed another song for it (Hint: see #7 on this list)

 

7. Love is the MOMENT

Can I just talk for a second about how much I love Changmin!  And his voice in this song is beautiful, like a phoenix song as it soars over rainbows higher and higher just to catch a little bit of stardust.

To be honest, the first time I heard this song, I laughed. Because the English lyrics were so obvious, too silly. But now whenever I hear it, I feel alive. I live for this moment. Because Love. IS. THE. MOMENT!

 

Bonus – The Schindler’s List Theme

Is this track supposed to be background music? I don’t understand why this song is in here. It makes me think of genocide, which is the utmost crime against humanity. This song should never ever be played in a cafe, unless the owners want their customers crying into their Americanos.

 

 

Hope these tunes made you remember the feels of the show. Remember what Kim Tan wrote down for his homework assignment. “One who wants to wear the crown, bears the crown.” And the HEIRS OST is doing just that. It’s King and will be reigning for a very long time. Perhaps until I’m an old granny.

-Maura

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